Study World Politics, Economics, Language, Culture, History / School of International Relations, University of Shizuoka

University of Shizuoka

School of International Relations
Graduate School of International Relations

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  • Introduction to the Graduate School

Introduction to the Graduate School

Multidisciplinary research of international relations and cultures
Development of innovation based upon core knowledge and skills

In the graduate school, we explore international relations and multifaceted cross-cultural studies, building core fundamentals and expanding individuality because people are both individuals and members of society.

The world we live in is growing increasingly more diverse and complex due to "internationalization" and "globalization". Understandably, there are many academic disciplines that touch upon human activities (e.g., cultural studies, linguistics, history, anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, and law). These disciplines constitute the graduate school’s educational infrastructure.

No matter what topic a student explores, emphasizing personal knowledge of the issues and exploration of their challenges is critical, as is learning an effective methodology and expanding personal individuality based on evidence. This underscores the necessity of both core fundamentals and originality. Students will also need to be aware of the relationships between various academic fields. All academic fields have significant relationships to other disciplines.

The graduate school has established two major fields of study, International Relations and Comparative Cultures, to achieve this goal. Furthermore, our three attached research centers (Center for Contemporary Korean Studies, Wider Europe Research Center, Center for Global Studies) create an infrastructure capable of matching our diverse range of students' research interests. These research centers are important places, backed by a solid foundation, for realizing creativity and originality.

Ryokichi Maeyama, Dean of the Graduate School of International Relations

The Graduate School of International Relations offers a Japanese examination for international applicants beginning from the year 2017.

Starting from our fall examination in 2016, international applicants for the International Politics and Economics Course, the International Behavioral Sciences Course, the Asian Culture Course, and the European Culture Course have the option of choosing a new foreign language examination in Japanese as a second language among a wider variety of foreign language examinations.

  • All applicants besides international students have the same options of foreign language examinations as have been offered previously.
  • International applicants have the option of an English as a foreign language examination.
    Applicants for the European Culture Course have the option of any one of the English, French, German, and Spanish as a foreign language examinations.
    Applicants for the Japanese Culture Course are required to take a Japanese language examination.
  • Applicants for the English and American Culture Course as well as international students are required to take an English examination.
Research field Foreign language examination options
International Politics and Economics English. International applicants have the option of choosing Japanese.
International Behavioral Sciences English. International applicants have the option of choosing Japanese.
Japanese Culture English, but international applicants are required to choose Japanese.
Asian Culture English. International applicants have the option of choosing Japanese.
English and American Culture English.
European Culture Any one of English, French, German, and Spanish. International applicants have the option of choosing Japanese.

For further details, refer to our guidelines for applicants.

  • Introduction to the Graduate School
  • Graduate School Features
  • Introduction to the Research Fields

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